New Tangle named “Candor”

Once  you start tangling, you see patterns everywhere!  I found this pattern on a door at the Cantor Center for Visual Arts, a museum in Stanford University.  It was so very beautiful, and what struck me as curious is it truly looked like a typical Zentangle-like pattern, with sinuous S shapes, orbs and even straight lines.

I can’t imagine the looks I got while taking a close-up photo of the inside of the front door of the Cantor Center.. in a museum full of art, I photograph the door?!

The design is beautiful, as you can see.

cantor-door-low

At first glance it looks very similar to  Zentangle’s Fife, or Quandry.  The visible differences are:

  • Fife uses rice-grain shapes, whereas Candor uses leaf-shapes.
  • Fife includes an additional grain that is drawn behind.
  • Candor’s leaves are each aura’d.
  • Candor’s center is more an orb, rather than a dot.
  • If we were to be true to the entire Candor design, it also includes orbs inside each leaf, and furthermore has a background of straight lines, behind the leaves.

When I first looked at the door and tried to draw the step-out, I though easy peasy!  However to get a close representation of Candor, it took me a few attempts to work out the kinks, so because of this added complexity, it is more of an intermediate/advanced design rather than a design easy for beginners.

So what are the gotcha’s that make Candor less easy than first appears?

  1. The center dot needs to be a larger orb shape, because we need space to anchor the the 6 leaves and their auras.
  2. The leaf points should just touch the center orbs.
  3. The auras should truly aura the leaf shapes, and not end in a point (this is why we need the extra space!)
  4. Each alternate row of orbs needs to be offset from the top, so that the hexagon shape is equilateral (each spoke and outside line being the same length) – this is where the big difference with Fife exists, because the Fife framework is a much simpler line of dots repeated directly under each-other.

Phew.  It sounds complicated, but once you “get the gist” it isn’t that hard for an intermediate Tangler!  So here is my step-out!  I will likely update the step-out to add more explanation, or if I work out an easier way of replicating the pattern, so please check back regularly!  You can download a PDF of the stepout here.

candor-stepout-connie-green

Enjoy tangling with Candor!

Oh, by the way…  the name comes from CANtor DoOR.

p.p.s.  there is another beautiful design on the bottom of the photo, which is also part of the Cantor door!  Maybe Candor 2?  🙂

 

 

 

Happy October!

I’ve been tangling daily, and here is my latest. The tangling was fairly speedy, but detailed shading always takes me a long time!  

Tangles are a Huggins/Pax hybrid, with Quib and Tipple.

Upgrade to my portable kit

I’ve decided to include 4″ Bristol tiles in my toolkit, and to keep the tiles clean and unbent, I needed a larger folder, and larger black tile support. Here they are!  Because I also wanted to carry Bijou tiles, I’m trying out a tiny wrap made from the leftover paper, along with a loose silicone band. 

In the folder, the 4″ tiles are on the left, and the 3.5″ Zentangle tiles on the right.   The flip side of the tile support is for 3.5″ tiles. 


Happy tangling!

Liking your tiles.. Or not!

Often, at the end of tangling, I look at my tile and think.. Errm, well, that was therapeutic and I feel really good, but my tile is a bit.. uneven, or too bold, or not shaded right, or …   I don’t throw it away, instead, I set it aside.  It’s common to look back at tiles which I have completed and didn’t like, only to find that this time around, there are things about it that I like.  Like this tile..  

Re-centering

So many things in life knock us sideways, and it really helps if we have some tools that we can use to help us get back on track.  This happened to me on Friday last week, when I was overwhelmed by a family event.  I just didn’t know how to work through the emotions.  Tears were shed, but I was still unsettled.  So, I turned to my ZM practice, and worked – one stroke at a time, while sitting in a coffee shop with a latte.  The only thing planned on this tile was the word Gratitude.  ZM just works!IMG_4728